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Volunteers with breast cancer phone bank have compelling stories to tell and reasons why they're paying it forward

CBS 58 was proud to host a phone bank for people to get information about services and treatments in the ongoing fight against breast cancer.

Among the volunteers was survivor Amberlea Childs who head the Kohl's Conversations for the Cure Program to get the word out about free mammograms.

"We have resources. We are the bridge," Childs told the CBS 58 News at Noon. "We've educated over 20,000 women. And we're able to help pay for some of those mammograms. The one excuse we hear all the time is I have to work. We know women get one preventable mammogram a year. Ask your boss. Say this is important to me. I need off to get my mammogram."

Then there was Keetah Smith handling the phones in the name of her grandmother, a 21 year survivor, and her mother who recently was diagnosed with breast cancer and joined her daughter at the phone bank.

"It's a lot about screening." Smith responded when asked about her most frequent question at the phone bank. "And also questions for younger women. When should I start. Women 40 and over should have a mammogram and women 20 to 39 should have a clinical breast exam done by your provider."

Carol Cameron with the Pink Shawl Initiative was also on hand.The group came about after four women associated with the Indian Summer Festival were diagnosed. She was among them.She wants the public to know that breast cancer affects everyone.

"We're an American Indian breast cancer organization that started ten years ago," Cameron told CBS 58's Michele McCormack. "Most women thought this was not our disease. We want to bring this message to women in pink shawls in the pow wow arena. All women you need to be screened."

The group will be hosting a screening event November 11th at the Southeastern Oneida tribal service office. There will be free clinical breast exams and mammograms. Participants will qualify for a $20 Kohl's gift card.

All said their mission was to offer hope and make sure patients, no matter what stage of cancer they might face, feel included in the collective effort to find a cure.

(414) 777-5801.

The phone bank resumes between 4-6 p.m.

Look for more compelling stories tonight on the CBS 58 News at 4 and 5. 




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