CBS 58 Ready Weather team doing what we do best: Getting you ready for severe weather season

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MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) -- This is one of the most important weather blogs I write all year. The overall topic is severe weather season. But more specifically, it’s all about loading yourself with good, helpful information, so you get in front and stay in front of the storm, both literally and figuratively. I really could spend all day writing information on this subject. So I’ll hit some of the highlights. First of all, when it comes to severe weather, knowledge really is power. I know it sounds cliché, but it could save your life. Of all the websites I’ve seen over the years pertaining to dangerous weather, www.ready.gov,is by far one of the best sites you’ll come across. It is very thorough with terminology and making plans during various weather situations.

CBS 58 held a live question and answer session on severe weather. 

"We still live in a part of the country where we can get severe weather anytime in the day and anytime at night," CBS 58 Chief Meteorologist Drew Burgoyne said. "I get this question a lot, 'what time do we typically see severe weather?' Usually it is late afternoon and into the evening and that makes sense because it’s peak heating."

The full question and answer session can be seen below:

Drew Burgoyne
Chief Meteorologist
7:29
“we still live in a part of the country we can get a of severe weather anytime in the day and anytime at night, I get this question a lot, what time do we typically see severe weather usually its late afternoon and into the evening and that makes sense because it’s peak heating”

Do you have ways to get severe weather information? They are generally four. Through your cell phone with apps and an Emergency Alert System as part of your phone. A NOAA weather radio is a great source. Of course CBS 58, on air and online (cbs58.com) is vital! And then there are outdoor sirens. This method is probably one of the most unreliable sources, seeing it’s tailored to people who are outside. I’ve always said the best practice is to make sure you have at least two ways of getting the information.


One of the best acronyms when it comes to tornado preparedness is DUCK.

D=Down to the lowest level (in a room without windows)

U=Under something sturdy like a staircase or heavy table to protect you from flying debris

C=Cover your head with a helmet, pillows, blanket, or a mattress

K=Keep in shelter until the storm has passed (use portable radios, cell phones for information)

And while you’re sheltered in place, make sure you have a “several days” supply of medicine, plenty of bottled water, a list of emergency numbers, fresh batteries, and good shoes for walking.

Lastly, make sure you’ve downloaded the free CBS 58 weather app to keep track of what’s on the radar at all times. Plus you get real time weather alerts as well.

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