Hispanic Heritage Month: Celebrating the history and traditions of piñatas

NOW: Hispanic Heritage Month: Celebrating the history and traditions of piñatas

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MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) -- Like tequila and tacos, piñatas have made their way and become popular in the United States. 

Two Wisconsin women we spoke with have spent the last two years sharing these treasured symbols of Mexican culture.

The shape of the piñata in and of itself is significant. Catholic tradition holds that each pointed cone represents one of the deadly sins. Once you break the piñata, you "fight" against sins, and blessings are brought upon the crowd.

Gabriela Marvan and Rosy Murillo are both piñata experts. They say what is most important is their desire to share their talents and knowledge with the next generation of young Latinos.

"I think it is important to share part of our culture, to create empathy and through empathy, reduce racism," said Marvan. "And on the other hand, to share this with the new generations, that in their life have never been to Mexico, and how to have that closeness with your roots and that is very important."

Marvan currently has an exhibit in Rhinelander with the hope that her work will broaden and elevate Wisconsin residents' perception of piñatas and their history.


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